Friday, October 3, 2014

I'm a book publisher, learning from my previous lives

My first job after college was as assistant editor of a magazine that went to hi-fi dealers. As a "trade magazine" entirely financed by advertisers, we sometimes delayed an issue by a day or two or three to bring in more ads. Readers got their subscriptions for free so almost no one complained if a magazine was late. If someone did complain, we always blamed the Post Office. 



After that, I was an editor in Rolling Stone's Manhattan office, in an era when headquarters was in San Francisco. Deadlines were inflexible. We had no fax machines, email or FedEx in 1971 and I sometimes drove to Laguardia airport to have a column air-freighted cross-country.



After that I was an "award-winning Madison Avenue copywriter." Ad production schedules were rigid with several people monitoring progress of various departments. If an ad did not reach a print publication on time, or a commercial did not reach a TV network or radio station on time, the agency lost income and might lose a client. Production schedule charts were on walls where everyone involved could keep track of what had to be done, when. If we had to work through lunch, or until 3 AM or on weekends, well, it's the nature of the business.


Since 2008 I have operated my own tiny Silver Sands Books (more than 40 books so far). I have no one supervising me, but I do keep a big production chart on the wall. It's not a rigid schedule. In fact, it's more of a wish list to keep me aware of what should be done approximately when, and what has slipped back because of my own changing priorities or outside factors beyond my control.

Even though I am the boss, the chart has a powerful presence and is not easily ignored. I ultimately get to decide if I am going to devote time, energy and money to a new book rather than revise an old one or finish an overdue one -- but I have to answer to the almighty chart.

(It also helps me keep track of the ISBNs I've assigned or not used.)

New book: Do As I Say, Not As I Did.



1 comment:

  1. Good advise, as usual. Thanks. I'm going to go to Staples and get an erasable chart today.

    ReplyDelete