Sunday, August 22, 2010

If you have even a small publishing company, booksellers may set up stores that feature your books





(left-click to enlarge images)

(I'll be in No-Computer-Land Sunday night and Monday morning, so this posting will have to serve as Monday's edition of the blog.)

I formed my little publishing company, Silver Sands Books, in 2008. I planned to write and publish exactly ONE book, mostly as a gift for friends and family.

I liked publishing so much, I quickly got addicted, and have just finished my tenth book. Two more are nearly finished, one is about one-third finished, and some others exist only as concepts or fantasies.

While my output certainly doesn't compare to Simon & Schuster--or even Outskirts Press--it's a lot of titles for a part-time hobby-business, and I'm proud of what I've accomplished. I've gotten good reviews, I've helped and entertained my readers, I have not missed any mortgage paymens, and the monthly checks keep getting bigger.

Once a self-publisher has more than one title, bookselling robots treat the business as a REAL publisher. Yesterday, while Googling the name of my company, I was surprised to see that Tower Books had set up a mini-store for my titles. I poked around a bit more online and found similar set-ups at Amazon and other booksellers' websites--even a Spanish-language site, iguama.com, and a weird couol.com--which I had never heard of.

I have no idea how much business these pages generate for me, but I didn't pay a penny or even click a mouse to cause them to exist.

I fully realize that these pages were assembled by robots, not by publishing experts who have recognized and validated my accomplishments.

Nevertheless, when things are not going exactly the way I planned (I'm 64 years old and some body parts don't work as well as they used to, and I've been accused of some terrible crimes by a cyber-psycho), I can look at a page full of books I've produced in just two years, and smile. In my first two years in business, I've probably published more titles than some "real" publishers did in their first two years--and I've bad a ball doing it.

If you enjoyed writing and publishing your first book, don't stop. Later books should be easier to publish, and will probably be better books.

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